Young Chess Stars Win Tournament

By Post Staff

Chess tournament winners receive certificates at a ceremony held at the Lakeview Branch of the public library. Certificates were donated by the Mayor’s Office. First row (L to R) Tommy Jones, 3rd grade, Carl Munck Elementary;  Noni Carter,  1st Grade,  MLK Elementary; James Jones, 5th Grade, Carl Munck. Middle row: Mary Farrell, Head Librarian of Lakeview Library;  Hattie Carwell, Founder of MAAT Science Village. Back row: Steve McCuthchen, Chess Coach/Teacher at Carl Munck Elemenary; Jan Blythe, Wil Delaney, and Marvin Willis, members of the MAAT Science Village Chess Club. Photo by Gene Hazzard.
Chess tournament winners receive certificates at a ceremony held at the Lakeview Branch of the public library. Certificates were donated by the Mayor’s Office. First row (L to R) Tommy Jones, 3rd grade, Carl Munck Elementary; Noni Carter, 1st Grade, MLK Elementary; James Jones, 5th Grade, Carl Munck. Middle row: Mary Farrell, Head Librarian of Lakeview Library; Hattie Carwell, Founder of MAAT Science Village. Back row: Steve McCuthchen, Chess Coach/Teacher at Carl Munck Elemenary; Jan Blythe, Wil Delaney, and Marvin Willis, members of the MAAT Science Village Chess Club. Photo by Gene Hazzard.

The Science Village Chess Club of the Museum of African American Technology recently held a chess tournament for Oakland youth K-12 in Frank Ogawa Plaza.
Twenty-one young contestants participated in the tournament, which took place Saturday, May 9. There were four winners: Tahi Campbell, a second grader at Carl Munck Elementary School; Lance Finley, a third grader at Carl Munck; Allison Naganuma, a fifth grader at Carl Munck; and Fernando Iglesias, a sixth grader at East Oakland Leadership Academy.
“This contest helps young people develop their critical thinking skills and is a positive thing for them to do with their time.  It’s exciting to see how rapidly they learn, faster than most adults,” said Marvin Willis, the program director for the chess club.
It’s a shame, Willis said, that Oakland has no citywide chess club, but he hopes to see one start in the near future.
The Museum of African American Technology is a non-profit organization created in 2006, whose mission is in part to provide a venue for Oakland youth to engage in activities that both challenge and develop their minds.